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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
have a foreign policy that is coming apart. >>gregg: you were in the carter administration. all hands on deck the. >> the president himself, for ten, 15, 20 hours a day, in the middle of the greatest moments of this, involved himself personally. we were trying to get them out the day they flew home we were there all night and the next morning up until the time of the inauguration and the president was hands on. the notion this president was disengaged and talked to no one after the 15 minute meeting and went off the next day to a fundraiser? now we understand and this is causing the republicans today to start saying, patrol and -- start saying, graham and others, they will hold up the nomination. >>gregg: does it appear lights were out at the white house while an american diplomat was underattack and other americans? >> that is right. to me, the bottom line question that pat raises and you raised, too, do we have a coherent foreign policy and national security policy not only through iran and north korea but through the role of the united states in rooting out terrorism in north afric
and didn't because he was so, quote, strong on foreign policy. >> you say, quote. that's why i voted for him. i trusted george bush to make hard, tough decisions that i thought john kerry might waver on. >> thank you. which is why i don't think obama will have any problem with this. >> i think it helps him. >> he'll look like a strong, and just like he did a year ago, just like when he killed bin laden, he looks incredibly strong on foreign policy. and this will not provide a weak spot for him in the long run. >> mika, really quickly, i agree with you there. i don't think there's going to be a political fallout from it. >> yeah. >> i think one of the things that disturbs me so much is the fact that americans are not any more concerned about other americans being able to be targeted and killed without any due process. and i'll say it again because i can hear people saying, well, why didn't you say that about george w. bush? i did. i did on padilla. i did when there were americans whose constitutional rights were being eviscerated by what was going on during the bush era. i spoke out t
the weapons. >> you delivered a major foreign policy today at the heritage foundation. well thought out speech on national security issues. why now? why did you decide to do it? because you knew that it was going to jump-start the speculation you want to establish foreign policy credentials for a possible run in 2016. >> you know, i just joined the foreign relations committee. i wanted to spell out what my mission is for the foreign policy. it's a unique position and one that needs to be expressed. we often have two polar extremes and really just one, for the most part, that we're everywhere you will a of the time. the other extreme is that it would be nowhere any of the time and that would be isolationism. there's a realistic approach somewhere in the middle and it would involve containment. i talked a lot about george kennan who may be the most famous diplomats, thought to be one of the chief architects of containment and i think there's some of ththat may apply to rad islam. it's an thet cal to freedom and has to be opposed at various parts around the world but i don't think the standard ap
, had choice words for the president's foreign policy team. i'm not sure i agree with that. in "the new york times," a great must-read, quietly killing a consumer watchdog. it's how the republicans are just doing everything they can not to have the consumer financial protection bureau that was created by elizabeth warren under president obama actually function because it would keep them, quite frankly, from being able to get their money from all their donors on wall street. and they do not want to lose the people who helped them out. so they want to make sure that the consumer suffers so that they can gain politically. it's a good one. take a look at it. coming up -- >> we're also going to talk about nancy pelosi saying we don't have a spending problem, and the problem with medicare is not medicare. we've got a lot to talk about straight ahead. >> gail collins of "the new york times" joins us straight ahead. >> she's got a great column. >> i love it. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely,
that i began in 1976 to galvanize african-american opinion on foreign-policy issues, particularly issues that concern the black world, u.s. policy towards africa, the caribbean and latin america. so transafrica of course was the organization that used its incher mentalities to galvanize american opposition to apartheid and with the embassy arrests that we were able to organize the arrest of 5000 people and in the 1980s and 1984 and the next year, and with that working with members of congress. we won the support for the set of sanctions that president reagan vetoed and his veto was overridden by a republican-controlled senate excess of the work we did and the millions we organized to make a difference. that, coupled with the great work that was being done in south africa led to a new africa that we see today. but we have been doing that work over a period of time. i had been there 25 years when i stepped down. >> host: who are maxey and doris robinson? >> guest: maxie robinson was my father and doris robinson was my mother. and i have already introduced you to them. they had strong opini
get away. went into iraq. when you look at how he conducted foreign policy between iraq and afghanistan and how this president has gotten us out of iraq and afghanistan, gotten bin laden and is certainly a lot less casualties than we've been having but that being said, you know chris, we should have a legal expert out on what makes you an american citizen or not or whether that makes you an enemy combatant, i don't know. >> well, you know, also we created al-qaeda since osama bin laden and ha deem to go after the soviets in afghanistan. we really have nothing to complain about. we put that all in motion. >> stephanie: richard in chicago. >> caller: good morning. i think -- i'm a big obama supporter but this is just wrong. i do feel like -- and i'm not going to blame this -- this policy is an obama policy. the escalation of drones. it has been happening. you know i just think it is a slippery slope where it turns into a convenient way to intervene, you know. you can withdraw from afghanistan and iraq without using drones. this is just an escalation of his policy and you k
and it is the lasting legacy of foreign policy. >> and that leave mes with the question because of so many ideological differences of president obama and president bush, but not on this. it suggests possibilities that presidents are just presidents and they always expand their kind of war powers which is one possibility, and the other is that the president nose something that i don't know about what constitutes threats to the national security, and the third is that well, on this one question, this president is just as hawk ish as george w. bush and any way to adjudicate the possibilities of what war means to the obama administration? >> well, i think that, i think that is absolutely right, it has been a continuation of the bush administration policies, and yes, administrations always try to push the outer bounds of the authority. but one thank is clear is that the laws of war have not changed even if the practice has changed. there are really three reasons that a country can, a state can use force outside of its borders. one, if it is the victim of an armed attack and second if the u.n. security coun
/11 obviously certainly on foreign policy became much more conservative. >> he always was. i mean, he was always a sort of new york zionist, supported israel wholeheartedly, you know, sent a delegation to central america in the mid-'80s to chart a course against, you know, sort of the communist rule in nicaragua. that sort of thing in foreign policy terms. but in sort of fiscal terms and in governance terms, he would say, you know, siding with criminals over law-abiding citizens is nuts. saying it's okay to do graffiti on subways is nuts. saying that it's okay for homeless people to sleep on grates on second avenue is nuts. this was all very much the way ordinary people felt, and they felt that democrats and the leadership of the left had turned against ordinary citizens and the good order of their lives. and he stood up against that. >> right. and seemed same and rational unless you were a member of the democratic establishment in the late '70s and '80s when koch was mayor. so it sounds very sane and rational right now in new york city. it didn't at the time. >> it was a much different -- the t
that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no. >> my reference to the -- >> are you going to answer the question, senator hagel? the question is, were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> well -- >> i would like the answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things today. >> well, let the record show you refuse to answer that question. >> ana, the viewers may not know the history between hagel and mccain. they were close friends in 2000. not so in 2008 when it was clear that hagel's wife was supporting obama and not mccain. was that personal? >> i don't think so at all. anybody who ever saw mccain grill donald rumsfield knows that this is john mccain. this is his job. they are there to advise and consent, not to rubber stamp. if they are not going to get the scrutiny and tough questions now, then when? >> why was he so much tougher on chuck hagel than john kerry? >> because there a
as a kid. went off and served in the military, and was a foreign policy specialist in the senate. chairman of the foreign relations committee. he's basically been campaigning, subtly, for this job, all along. and you can just see the comfort level that he had there. you know, those of us who have covered him in politics, he's kind of awkward, a little bit difficult. you remember the situation with the wind surfing. you know, i voted for the $87 billion before i voted against it. he has some awkwardness in the retail politics area. he has no awkwardness when it comes to diplomacy. and you can see him really enjoying, flying around capitals of the world. this is what john kerry was meant to do. >> dana milbank of "the washington post," good to see you. >>> senator bob menendez breaking his silence. it is time now for the poly-side bar. >> the smears that the right wing have been pushing since the election, and it's totally unsubstantiated. it's amazing to me that anonymous, nameless, faceless individuals on a website can drive that type of story into the mainstream. the bottom line is all of
dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? >> my -- >> yes or no. >> my reference to -- >> are you answering the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> well -- >> i would like to answer whether you were right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer -- >> well, let the record show that you refuse to answer that question. now please go ahead. >> welcome back to "hardball." that was senator john mccain grilling his old friend chuck hagel last week at hagel's confirmation hearing. the senate armed services committee was supposed to vote today on hagel's nomination to head the pentagon, but that vote has been postponed after republicans said they hadn't received sufficient information about hagel's financial records and specifically about any payments he's received from foreign sources. that's an odd hurdle given that republicans never seem concerned about foreign revenue sources when it came to nominees from
means to president obama's legacy, specifically as we discuss foreign policy and the next four years. >> well, it's going to mean a great deal. after all, two of the accomplishments barack obama is trying to claim is going to be getting us out of war in iraq and out of afghanistan, by 2014 we have to withdraw 66,000 troops from afghanistan. now, the military will deal with that. but john kerry will have to do a lot of diplomacy with pakistan, who are not really sure whether we can trust right now. i think that the key for kerry will be when we move equipment and personnel out of afghanistan through the routes to pakistan, kerry can get done deals out of that country that they live up to. >> of course, americans know him as a multiterm congressman, 30 years in congress in the senate. but what do the rest of the people around the world think of, when they think of john kerry? and what message are they getting, as he embarks on a job that will more than likely see them land in one of their countries? >> well, look, hillary clinton just did 1 million miles, that's a lot of transit for se
the president's foreign policy priorities ought to be, looking at response to the turmoil of the arab spring, dealing with russia wouldn't seem to be anyone's natural first priority right now. jenna: one of the arguments, though, for doing this, according to "the new york times," is it would save a lot of money. if we don't have to keep these nuclear weapons and store them and watch them, that's going to save us a lot of cash, and we know the type of financial situation we're in right now. why isn't that a good argument? >> one, everyone would like to save cash, but really we've had $5 trillion added to our national debt over recent years, and maintenance of our nuclear strategic capability contributed nothing to that. and the proposed cuts, they say, would reduce about $120 billion in spending over 20 years, which is really a drop in the wasn't compared -- bucket compared to approaching $20 trillion in national debt. the second is the cut into intellectual capabilities well that should be stimulating economic development, research and development and applied technology. hitting these areas,
and as a solar was able to question foreign policy of the united states publicly? >> i think so. we are familiar with that story. here's a man who was an ivy leaguer, who volunteered for vietnam. he won three purple hearts, a silver star and bronze star. as you say he came back and rejected them. he talked about how immoral the war in vietnam was. that played well around the world. there is still swift boat veterans for truth and groups angry at kerry for that. globally that played pretty well. now kerry who is well known by denouncing vietnam, is in charge of getting us out of afghanistan. so there's an ironic link between the two wars. >> i would be remiss if i didn't use this opportunity while you are on live with me to show a long list of all of the books that you have written, and one of them happens to be the biography of rosa parks. today would be rosa parks 100th birthday. there is a commemorative stamp being released today. it's a significant moment in u.s. history. what are some of the more surprising things, that you learned about rosa parks, in all of your research for the biography?
than his confirmation hearing. >> mourn ever foreign policy is economic policy. the world is competing for resources, and global markets, and the first priority of business which will affect my credibility as a diplomat and our credibility as a nation as we work to help other countries create order, the first priority will b america at last puts its own fiscal house in order. >> reporter: now when telling the officials here that he understands the difficulties faced by america's foreign service, our overseas diplomats, secretary kerry made reference to the four americans killed in benghazi e. said he would not let their sacrifices being obscured by poll tickets. fox news has confirmed through senior service career officer types that secretary kerry visited some of the wounded benge arsurvivors at walter reed medical hospital over this past weekend. martha. martha: very interesting. thank you very much. we'll see you soon. >> we are getting new details on the on going hostage crisis in alabama. a man is still holding a five-year-old boy hostage in a very small 6x8 underground bunker. th
. that did not do military policy or tactics. we don't to foreign policy or tactics. we try to look at the process. if you say this is your program, this is your policy, this is the reason why you're doing it and receive it is done correctly, do you mean when you articulate is the reasons for doing it. i hope that answers that. we do recognize intangible. we do recognize that, and as i said, in the presentation, there may be programs that will not meet any of these questions, but still, we should do them. if so, articulate why. tell the taxpayer, tell us when we come by looking at the project. turning to the doctor, and i hope i get all of the res ponces. we are looking. i apologize the shortened it. rio achaean saw the planning. i'd agree with you. we're having a problem finding out what can the planning is going on. trading the speech is the kind of getting people into we hope you're doing the planning and when you are you keep these questions in mind. i was just seven afghanistan asking why you're planning. can you show us the plans? rihanna seen them. we assume they're there. we
secretary kerry said as he addressed the audience here this morning. he has a wealth of foreign policy experience he brings to the job of course but also many years as a public speaker and like the best them he began here this morning with a few good jokes. >> i have to tell you, i liked my cubicle over there in transition corner. [laughter] >> but i cannot tell you how great it feels to sort of be liberated to know that i actually get to explore the whole building now. [laughter] >> so i've been freed. i'm the first person you guys freda, this is pretty good. [laughter] >> the nation's 68th secretary of state is the first child of a career foreign service officer to lead the department of state. secretary kerry told officials here at the harry s. truman building that he will advocate for them and they will embark together on a great adventure. >> we get to try to make peace in a world where there is far too much conflict and far too much killing. there are alternatives. we get to lift people out of poverty. we get to try to cure disease, we get to try to empower people with human righ
and advise the senior most policy makers about government about a foreign, political, and economic developments, or an operations officer, whose job it is to find and obtain those elusive secrets to provide advance warning and strategic surprise, impending violence, cyber attacks and a persistent threats such as nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons proliferation, or a technical expert, who finds nuggets of intelligence in tremendous volumes of data, provides secure data collection and systems and encountered the latest threats to our nation, or a support officer whose responsibility is to provide analysis and when directed by the president, conducting covert action and carried out with the provision speed, skill, and efficiency. and from sub-saharan africa to central and south america to the vast expanses of asia and the great cities of europe and all countries in between, cia officers were there, sometimes in force and sometimes virtually standing alone. and for those 25 years, it was a great honor for me to be a cia officer, as i knew that this country's contributions to sec
and said the principles of american foreign policy are firmly -- the foundation is firmly rooted in righteousness and justice. we get to do great things here. this is a remarkable place. i am here today to rescue, on -- to ask you, on behalf of the country, i need your help. president obama need your help. to help us, to do everything we can to strengthen our nation and to carry those ideals out into the world. here, we can do the best of things you can do in government. that's what excites me. we get to try to make our nation safer. get to try to make peace in the world, a world where there is far too much conflict, far too much killing. there are alternatives. we get to try to cure disease and empower people who have no voice. we get to talk about empowering people through our ideals and through those ideals hopefully they can change their lives. that's what's happening in the world today. we get to live the ideals of our nation which and in doing , so i think we can make our country stronger and we can make the world more peaceful. so i look forward to joining with you as we m
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)